Video: Lists, Loops, and Logic in Python

This is the third of a series of Videos we’re releasing that cover key concepts of Python using Trinket.  Below the video you’ll find interactive trinkets with the exact code you see in the videos!  This way, you can follow along as the video plays.  If you’d like more great video content, check out Python Game Development for Beginners, a video we made with O’Reilly Media!  Or, find other free video posts on this blog here.

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Video: Your First Interactive Program

This is the second of a series of Videos we’re releasing that cover key concepts of Python using Trinket.  Below the video you’ll find interactive trinkets with the exact code you see in the videos!  This way, you can follow along as the video plays.  If you’d like more great video content, check out Python Game Development for Beginners, a video we made with O’Reilly Media!  Or, find other free video posts on this blog here.

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Video: Getting Started with Turtle

This is the first of a series of Videos we’re releasing that cover key concepts of Python using Trinket.  Below the video you’ll find interactive trinkets with the exact code you see in the videos!  This way, you can follow along as the video plays.  If you’d like more great video content, check out Python Game Development for Beginners, a video we made with O’Reilly Media!

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Rhett Allain on “Sloppy Code” and Messy Learning

Dr. Rhett Allain is an educator, author, and blogger who’s fascinated by physics.  In his books and on his blog for Wired he explores the wacky calculations behind cool things, real and imaginary.  From the physics of Stephen Curry’s Jump Shot to the Center of Mass of Thor’s Hammer, Allain consistently amuses an interests himself and his readers with great insights into the physics around us and in our culture, and he often uses code to make the calculations.  

In this interview, Allain talks about how he learned to code and how he’s using it to enrich himself, his readers, and his students.

You can find other interviews we’ve done with educational innovators here.

Rhett Allain and one of his research subjects
Rhett Allain with one of his research subjects

Elliott: How do you use code in a Physics classroom?

Rhett: For my introductory physics courses and labs, I now have the students make at least one numerical calculation (it doesn’t have to be in Python). The calculation should find the motion of an object with non-constant forces. Here’s a post I wrote with more details (including student complaints): http://www.wired.com/2014/02/isnt-physics-computer-science/

I love the way python lets you tackle interesting problems right away.

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Dan Aldred’s Coding Sites Reach the UK & Beyond

Dan Aldred is an exceptional teacher, even amongst the already great bunch we have the pleasure of working with every day at Trinket.  In addition to teaching sophmores (Year 10s, as they say over in the UK), Dan puts all of his educational material online at canyoucompute.co.uktecoed.co.uk and cambridgetech.co.uk.  In this interview, Dan talks about how he got into coding, his love of Python, and the importance of the online network of teachers he’s connected to.

You can read more of our interviews of educational innovators here.

Teacher Dan Aldred
Teacher Dan Aldred

Elliott: How did you first learn to code?

Dan: As a child I had an Atari ST and created a simple password diary that required a password to enter and read the entries.  You could add new entries and then lock them away from prying eyes.  I enjoyed the thinking side, thinking how I could create the diary, what features would it have and how I would use the code.  There was no internet so the only reference I had was the user guide that came with the computer.  I used to try out various codes to see what would happen or use the ‘help’ function to list all the possible commands and then give test them out.

 For me, Python is a language that feels alive, versatile and powerful.

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